"Kevin, I knew from the day we met that I had made the right choice. I will definitely recommend you to everyone I can...I cannot begin to express my deepest gratitude."


J. Solis- September, 2012


"Mr. Stouwie, I want you to know that my loved ones and I are very satisfied with your services. In my opinion, everything you did was perfect. You went above and beyond in your efforts to gain my freedom. I thank you for never giving up on me."


G. Flores - August, 2012


"Thank you so very much for winning my freedom back...My whole family says thank you as well...We made it!"


T. Morris - August, 2012


"Thank you for your hard work. I'm very grateful for having my son back."


M. Nguyen - June, 2012


"I'm stuck on WOW!!! During our interview, we discussed not expecting a miracle this go around. Repeat offender, two 18 year sentences, running cc, and you made my first parole! I'll be serving right at two years on this. UNBELIEVEABLE!...I'm just so grateful to you and your office for helping me gain my freedom...Nothing I can write on this paper could begin to express my gratitude."


Catherine B. - April, 2012


"I was granted the FI-2 and of course I am overjoyed and I want to thank you for all your assistance...I will recommend your services to others who may need trusted assistance in their (parole) review process."


T. Chau - March, 2012


"Thank you for all your help! May your family be blessed and you law office prosper and succeed. My freedom is precious and I shall not take it for granted."


​B. Henderson - November 2011

Attorney Kevin Stouwie chooses to focus his law practice on representing Texas prison inmates seeking early release through parole because he believes people can learn from past mistakes and society as a whole benefits when former inmates receive opportunities to build new lives.

Freedom is precious...

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Texas Parole Attorney

Fighting to Reunite Families Throughout Texas


Contact an Attorney who Understands Texas Probation Laws

Serving probation in Texas can be complicated, but the consequences of a probation violation are too serious to ignore. As part of our commitment to the rehabilitative side of the criminal justice process, we suggest all probationers take a long and careful look at the terms of their probation and ask for help if there is any confusion or uncertainty.  Probation, like parole, is considered a privilege, and it is far better in most cases to stay on probation than it is to be incarcerated for not adhering to the terms of probation.

Common Probation Violations

Probation violation consequences can be severe, including extension of the supervision period, imposition of additional conditions and requirements, or incarceration. Courts generally tailor each defendant's community supervision plan to suit his or her individual circumstances and offense. However, certain conditions appear in nearly every community supervision plan. As such, being convicted of a separate criminal offense while on probation or failing to pay any fines, fees, or restitution almost always constitutes a probation violation.

Case-Specific Probation Conditions

Most community supervision plans, however, are more complicated and Texas law gives the sentencing judge wide latitude to impose any conditions he or she thinks necessary to protect the community and promote the defendant's rehabilitation. Such conditions typically include one or more of the following:

  • Perform community service
  • Refrain from contact with former associates
  • Submit to drug and alcohol testing
  • Undergo counseling
  • Receive educational development
  • Maintain employment
  • Remain within a limited geographic area
  • Submit to electronic monitoring
  • Maintain cooperation with a probation officer
  • Pay court fines and probation fees

However, judges can impose - and some have built reputations for inserting - many other creative conditions into community supervision plans. Texas law may also require certain additional provisions for specific types of offenses. For example, a person who receives probation for certain sex offenses may be required to register as a sex offender and submit a DNA sample to the state. Those convicted of domestic violence must make a one-time payment to a local family violence center. Special conditions also exist for those who receive community supervision following a DWI conviction.

WHAT IS A PROBATION VIOLATION IN TEXAS?

Understanding the Rules and Staying Out of Jail

There is a common misconception that receiving probation instead of a jail sentence is, effectively, a "slap on the wrist". However, being under community supervision in Texas is a serious matter. Staying out of jail while on probation take a genuine commitment and careful attention to the terms of your individual supervision. However, even knowing what is a probation violation and what is not is not always straightforward. Probation departments and probation officers vary in terms of their quality and their willingness to communicate properly.  However, those who show genuine interest in adhering to the rules and staying out of trouble will generally be given all the requisite information and will find the best level of cooperation by probation officials.